Category Archives: Historian’s Mailbag

Historian’s mailbag: American Fabrics

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That brightly colored cotton swatch is glued onto the page.
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British Vogue, October 1949. Many women were still sewing at home (or getting a seamstress to create their clothes—advertising specific fabrics in fashion magazines made a lot of sense.

In the mail this week? Textile industry trade journals! Maybe that doesn’t sound terribly exciting at first glance, but trade journals are always a great resource if you are looking for period information about industry and manufacturing.  Fashion magazines featured full page advertisements for fabric companies and their latest and greatest fabrics until the 1970s or so (the cotton industry was probably the longest holdout, their Cotton advertisements showed up in fashion magazines into the 1990s.)

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Fabrics used in car upholstery…

But industry journals were geared toward garment and automobile manufactures, so their ads are more technical (and for me, that makes them more interesting!)

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…and in fashion…I love following the history of the different trade names. Crinkltex? There isn’t a whole lot of information around about Crinkltex—this suggest that Cranston debuted it and quickly moved along to another wrinkle-free option.

As a textile historian, the most helpful trade journal I’ve found so far is American Fabrics. This week, I was excited to find some issues in great condition on Ebay.

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This is also a real swatch of fabric. The condition is one of the best things about fabric swatches in catalogs, books and journals—these fabric samples have been shut away from sunlight, grime and water and they look almost as vibrant and crisp as they probably did when they were originally glued to the page.

American Fabrics began publication in the mid 1940s, and they quickly became leaders in the industry because of a new method they developed to add fabric swatches to their pages. While manufacturers regularly added swatches to their production catalogs for use as salesman samples, this was the first time a journal with a significant circulation could do the same. There are around 50 fabric sample swatches in each issue—although that number declines significantly in the 1970s issues I’ve seen. Adding so many swatches was an expensive process. They are SUCH fun to handle though. Vintage clothing (if it isn’t Dead Stock)  and household textiles have often lost their crisp original finishes and can be a bit dull in color from years of washing. These swatches are crisp and bright….they’ve been shut away from light for 60 years!IMG_4868

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These are glued along the top edge, so you can lift the swatch and handle the fabric.
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Many of the samples show natural fabrics mixed with new synthetics.

These issues give such interesting play by play coverage of the growth of the synthetic fiber revolution taking place during the middle of the 20th century.

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This two page advertisement discusses the use of Nylon in Vanity Fair lingerie and three generous samples have been “tipped in”
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Winter 1949. “breath of spring” makes me chuckle a bit here. This poor woman was probably overheating in this nylon sateen gown! I’m *pretty certain* that this isn’t a Lowe gown, although she partnered with the Stehli family during this time period and worked with Nylon during the forties, when it was a new and exciting luxury fabric. The earliest Lowe piece in the Met Museum is a 1940s Nylon Sateen gown.

And….because somedays I feel like I run into Ann Lowe information everywhere, this advertisement for the Stehli fabric company (formerly Stehli Silks and they also expanded into synthetics) is from a period when Mrs. Stehli was a partner in one of Ann’s early Madison Avenue dress shops. I’ve tried to figure out if Ann was able to get a better price on silks with this connection, but it was a brief partnership, and I keep running into dead ends. The Stelhi family member I was able to contact a few years ago didn’t know very much about the supply side of Ann Lowe’s business. This advertisement ALSO has me wondering if an Ann Lowe wedding gown ever appeared in a Stehli silk trade ad…more research rabbit holes to explore!


I’m working on an article about Fiberglas (One “S” is the original trade spelling) fabrics for HFH, and there’s some fantastic and in-depth coverage about the topic in one of these issues of American Fabrics, showing the production process and its “exciting new” use in household textiles. I was thrilled to see Fiberglas fabric swatches and filament samples also—-that I am NOT handling of course…want to avoid getting these samples to shed glass splinters into my fingers!!

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